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Beaches near Asfendhilés, in Chania region

Here is list of closest beaches to Asfendhilés

  • 3.3 km
  • Astropelekita beach
  • Fine Pebbles, Sand
  • Normal
  • Blue

On the European E4 trail linking Sougia and Paleochora, you’ll come across the stunning small beach of Astropelekita with its deep blue waters. This sandy beach, situated to the east of the rocky Plaka cape, is encountered before beginning the ascent to Flomes or Elide Cape, on the way to the ancient Lissos. This little cove offers a perfect opportunity for a refreshing swim while trekking the E4 trail.

Astropelekita, translating to ‘thunderbolt’ in Greek, is named after a local myth. The tale suggests that the area’s distinctive whitish rocks were created when the Olympian Gods hurled a thunderbolt at the region.

  • 5.6 km
  • Lissos beach
  • Pebbles
  • Normal
  • Blue

Lissos Beach, situated in the Agios Kyrikos region, lies about 71km south of Chania city and 3km west of Sougia. It was historically the seaport for the nearby town of Elyros, the remnants of which can now be found near the modern village of Rodovani.

Lissos Beach is a secluded and unspoiled spot, characterized by large pebbles and exposure to the southern winds. Visitors and campers can find shade under the beach’s abundant trees. Access to the beach is either via a 20-minute boat ride or a 90 to 120-minute hike from Sougia, a journey that passes through the scattered ruins of ancient Lissos.

Near the beach stands the charming Church of St. Kirikos, which holds a celebration on July 15th. If you happen to be in the area the day before, you can join in the festivities. Pilgrims arrive by boat from Sougia to participate in the ceremony and subsequent celebration.

Lissos experienced its golden age during the Hellenistic period, flourishing until the 9th century when it was razed by the Saracens. The town was renowned for its asclepion, or healing thermal baths, which attracted patients from across the island. The mosaic floors of Asclepios, despite being damaged by an earthquake, are still visible today.

A walk through the Lissos Valley will reveal an array of ancient ruins, including capitals, a Roman cemetery with vaulted graves, and the remains of an ancient theatre. The discovery of numerous statues and coins in the region suggests that Lissos was more prosperous than its parent city, Elyros. The most notable statues, those of the Goddess Hygeia (Health), Asclepius, and Pluto, are now displayed in the Archaeological Museum in Chania.

  • 5.7 km
  • Keratides beach
  • Pebbles
  • Normal
  • Blue

Keratides beach, situated approximately 1km west of Paleochora harbour and 79km south of Chania city, is found just past the Azogirianos river and Halikia beach. Characterized by its coarse pebbles and stones, it’s a preferred spot for those seeking tranquility and solitude. Its name, Keratides, is derived from the term for locust or carob trees, ‘keratia’. Nearby, there’s a camping site which attracts most of the beach’s visitors.

While there are numerous remarkable beaches in the vicinity of Paleochora, Keratides doesn’t particularly stand out. Nonetheless, it’s a viable option for those without access to a car or motorbike.

  • 6.1 km
  • Halikia beach
  • Pebbles
  • Normal
  • Blue

Votsala or Halikia beaches are situated just beyond the western limit of Paleochora harbour, about 79km to the south of Chania city, adjacent to the Kakodiakianos River’s outlet and stretch approximately 1km eastward. Halikia and Pahia Ammos are the primary beaches in the town of Paleohora. Halikia, with its round pebbles, is well maintained and is primarily favored by Greeks over the sandy Pahia Ammos beach. This beach is a popular choice for those who wish to stay near the town and enjoy easy access to all facilities.

Following the Azogirianos River’s exit, the subsequent beach named Keratides beach is formed. This beach is conveniently located next to the Paleochora camping site.

  • 6.7 km
  • Pahia Ammos beach, Paleohora